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  • Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. Instagram‘s one of the prime social networks, and its ads are sometimes marginally less obtrusive than the likes of its big brother, Facebook. But they’re still there and they can be a nuisance — especially if you’re getting ads that have nothing to do with what you’re interested in. Instagram provides a way for you to see what it thinks your interests are, so you can see what kinds of ads it’s going to serve you. These interests are pulled from accounts you follow, pictures you’ve liked, and other ads with which you’ve interacted. There are two slightly different paths to finding the list depending if you’re on mobile or the desktop site. To get to the list on mobile, go to Settings, then Security. Go to Access Data, then scroll all the way down to the bottom, where you’ll see Ad Interests, and select “View All.” On desktop, go to Settings, then Privacy & Security. Select “View Account Data,” and you’ll find Ad Interests at the bottom right. Once you’re at the list, you’ll have to keep hitting “View More,” in order to see more and more of the things Instagram thinks you’re interested in. In my case, the list is pretty on point, though I do wonder if having “Online Shopping” at the top of the list is a bit self-serving on Instagram’s part, especially considering I’ve never bought anything via Instagram. There’s one downside to this list, though: you can’t actually alter the list in anyway. You can’t delete any of the interests from here. The only way to alter the ads list is to hide ads you don’t think are relevant....
  • Anyone else think giving Facebook literal access to our brains is a catastrophically stupid idea? If you missed it: Facebook‘s building a brain computer interface (BCI). In the company’s words, the gadget will be: A non-invasive, wearable device that lets people type by simply imagining themselves talking. That makes it sound like a Bluetooth accessory you’ll wear on your head that let’s you chat hands-free using only your mind – perhaps with webcam models. When you think about it that way: here’s a link to Investopedia’s beginner’s guide to buying Facebook stock. All jokes aside, a well-functioning BCI could be the single greatest accessibility device ever invented. If it works properly, it could potentially give millions of disabled people a new kind of freedom to interact with technology. I believe BCI’s will eventually be great for everyone, and as soon as the general population gets savvy there’ll be no stopping them. Right now, it sounds kind of cool to type with your brain. But wait until you’re opening doors, cooking food, and playing Borderlands 3 while getting a manicure. BCI’s will be bigger than the Walkman (happy belated 4oth birthday!), the iPod, or any other gadget before or since. Let me be blunt: I believe BCI’s will be adopted by the population at-large within a decade of the first one being commercially launched. And, in the best interest of humanity, the world needs several companies developing BCIs. We need companies locked in iterative competition cycles fixated on pushing the boundaries of the technology. That’s how we get from smartphones to whatever’s next. But, if we let the likes of Facebook, Google, or any other company whose profits are directly affected by advertising develop a brain computer interface, we are setting ourselves up for catastrophe. Facebook has literally conducted psychological research on us as...
  • For the ongoing series, Code Word, we’re exploring if — and how — technology can protect individuals against sexual assault and harassment, and how it can help and support survivors. What started as a small collection of voices on Twitter has now ballooned into a full-blown movement, as more and more women in gaming come forward with accusations against men who’ve allegedly abused or assaulted them. As several observers have pointed out, it seems long overdue for the industry. Several women came forward earlier this week to disclose the names of men who’d sexually abused them or engaged in predatory behavior, and now many more have followed. One of the people named in the second wave is Michael Antonov, one of the cofounders of Oculus. Autumn Rose Taylor, marketing director for developer Owlchemy Games, alleged that Antonov used the cover of an Oculus VR demo to grope her. Fuck it. That this experience sticks with me years later… means something. This person in a position of power when VR was new made me feel small. I shouldn’t discredit my experience. Michael Antonov was a fucking creep to me at an Oculus event. Men don’t get to keep doing this. https://t.co/Q0vaIy20BK — Autumn Rose Taylor 🔜 #OC6 (@lusterly_) August 28, 2019 Antonov is no longer with Oculus, but Andrew Bosworth, the current VP of VR at Facebook, responded to Taylor on Twitter, saying, “I’m sorry it happened then and that you have to face the trauma again now.” He also linked to the company’s policy on workplace complaints and said, “I do not accept this behavior… You can hold me accountable if that’s not what you experience with Oculus or AR/VR at Facebook today.” Others called him out on this by linking to a tweet from Riot Games’ narrative designer Katie Chironis, who...
  • One of the major concerns when you buy an Android device is the frequency of updates you’ll receive over the years.. Google has been trying to solve that problem by pushing more fixes through the Google Play services, and initiatives like Project Treble and Project Mainline. Still, a lot of onus falls on phone makers to push frequent OS and security updates. A new report from the research firm Counterpoint shows how different manufacturers have pushed updates in the past year (Q3 2018 – Q2 2019). It notes that Nokia leads the race for pushing updates, with 96 percent of the phones it’s shipped in the past year running Android Pie 9.0. The Korean giant Samsung is in the second spot with 89 percent of its devices running the latest Android version. Top phone companies such as Xiaomi and Huawei have more than 80 percent devices running Android 9.o Pie. However, other leading firms such as Lenovo, Oppo, and Vivo have disappointing numbers with more than 50 percent of their devices still running Android 8.1 Oreo or older. The report also notes that Nokia updated almost 50 percent of its phones shipped in the last year to the latest Android version in six months. However, even after 12 months of Android Pie’s release, no other company apart from Xiaomi and Lenovo has updated more than half of its portfolio of phones to the latest version. Graph for the time taken by manufacturers to update their phones to the latest Android version This suggests that companies often release updates for their high-priced devices. But, their mid-range and budget devices might not get the love of the latest Android version. Counterpoint’s research director, Peter Richardson, said Android phone makers aren’t talking about the importance of updates enough, that’s why even customer awareness is...
  • Welcome to CHEAP, our series about things that are good, but most of all, cheap. CHEAP! I used to often avoid any activity because of lack of motivation. However, smartwatches helped me gamify that process, and now I genuinely look forward to completing my daily step goal. Apple Watch (which has $50 off on Amazon right now) is pretty much the best smartwatch you can get. But, if you’re using an Android phone or don’t want to spend too much when you’re trying to start your fitness journey, you have few options. Thankfully, Xiaomi’s AMAZEFIT smartwatch is on sale for just $62.99, down from $82.20. This entry-level lightweight watch has a 1.28-inch square screen. Its IP68 certification makes it waterproof and dustproof – ideal for tough weather or generally rough conditions. It has an in-built heart rate monitor to keep track of your steps, exercise, and calories burnt. Plus, the AMAZEFIT has GPN and GLONASS support, so you can track your runs pretty easily. The watch has a long-lasting battery of 45 days, so you won’t have to worry about charging it. Don’t wait for long. Get the Xiaomi AMAZEFIT smartwatch for just $62.99 ($19 off). This post includes affiliate links to products that you can buy online. If you purchase them through our links, we get a small cut of the revenue. For more gear, gadget, and hardware news and reviews, follow Plugged onTwitter andFlipboard. Published August 30, 2019 — 11:43 UTC Price$62.99 ProductAMAZEFIT Smartwatch by Xiaomi 10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that...
  • The US’ top financial watchdog has settled with Dallas-based blockchain startup Bitqyck Inc. over allegations it fraudulently sold shares of company stock to more than 13,000 buyers of its Bitqy cryptographic token. In a statement released yesterday, the US Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) also alleged the firm and its founders Bruce Bise and Sam Mendez fraudulently promised investors interest in a cryptocurrency mining facility through sales of a secondary token, BitqyM, and its related blockchain-powered smart contract. That facility was supposed to be powered by below-market rate electricity. As it turns out, there was no such deal, and no such facility – the entire mining operation was a fake. “Bitqyck, aided and abetted by its founders, also is alleged to have illegally operated TradeBQ, an unregistered national security exchange offering trading in a single security, Bitqy,” said the SEC. Although Bitqyck’s founders did not confirm or deny the allegations, the pair agreed to return all money raised (more than $13 million) with interest. Bise and Mendez will also need to pay a civil penalty of $8,375,617, as well as $890,254 and $850,022 respectively. This continues a veritable trend of judgements against (allegedly) fraudulent cryptocurrency startups across the US. Earlier this month, the SEC moved against a “self-described financial guru” that raised $14.8 million with an allegedly fraudulent ICO, while last week saw the SEC reach a settlement with a Russian firm that advertised initial coin offerings without disclosing that it had been paid to shill the coins. Whoops. Published August 30, 2019 — 15:09 UTC 10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway...
  • Security vulnerabilities have been discovered in “various” Bitcoin Lightning Network projects that have potential to cause users to lose their cryptocurrency. Those running Lightning Network nodes have been advised to upgrade their clients as soon as possible, including those related to popular wallet solution Eclair. At present, exact information is scarce, but the original post shared via a Lightning Network mailing list promises release of “full details” in four weeks. This method of disclosure is not without precedent. Privacy-focused altcoin Monero has repeatedly released details of dangerous security vulnerabilities in a similarly staggered fashion. The general idea is give the network enough time to patch the security flaws while simultaneously keeping bad actors in the dark, which (hopefully) stops the exploitation of bugs. Hard Fork has reached out to Rusty Russell, who originally shared the warning, and will update this piece with more information should we hear back. Published August 30, 2019 — 11:47 UTC 10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something anonymously on Internet. 10 minute mail
  • Is Apple hiding hints about the new phone in this event invite graphic? Maybe. (Apple/) Hacking an iPhone is hard and, generally, pretty expensive. In fact, history suggests that agencies have paid between $1 million and $2 million dollars for the privilege. This week, however, security researchers from Google’s Project Zero discovered a collection of hacked websites designed to install monitoring software on every iPhone that visits them. It’s called a “watering hole” attack and it affects iPhones running iOS 10 all the way up to the current version of iOS 12. This is a very serious hack and we don’t know what the websites are—or if there are more of them out there—so, it’s as important as ever to keep your device updated to employ the necessary security patches. This is your best defense: go to Settings, then General, then Software Update to check what version of iOS you’re running. With this kind of exploit, hackers could even get access to assets like tokens that keep you logged into accounts, which means they could get to them without the need for a password. Bad actors could also get access to your GPS location data, photos, iMessages, and pretty much anything else you keep on your phone. You can see the full analysis on the Project Zero blog, including in-depth looks at the exploit chains if you’re savvy when it comes to code. Once you’ve updated your phone and made a solemn resolution to stop going to so many sketchy websites, keep reading for a rundown of the week’s other big tech stories. Listen to the latest episode of the Techathlon podcast If you’re traveling for the Labor Day weekend—or you’re planning to lay in a hammock and eat hot dogs while desperately clinging to the final cycles of summer—let...
  • There are now 5,000 cryptocurrency ATMs all over the world, and of course, they’re proving to throw up a whole raft of opportunities for scammers to make a quick buck. And with recent news from Canada, I think we’ve seen the dumbest con yet. Police in Winnipeg have issued a warning to locals after con-artists started targeting users of the city’s Bitcoin BTC ATMs with the worst con ever, Canadian outlet City News reports. According to the report, scammers have been putting homemade out-of-order signs on the Bitcoin ATMs stating that they are currently undergoing software updates. The sign asks users to scan a QR code attached the sign as they buy Bitcoin from the convenience machine. The QR code however, connects the transaction to a Bitcoin wallet owned by the con-artists. As such, any funds the victim buys are redirected to the bad actors and not into their own wallet. Credit: City News CanadaThe homemade sign Imagine standing at a conventional cash ATM, outside your bank branch, reading a sign that’s telling you to deposit your cash into someone else’s bank account. That’s effectively what scammers were asking here. Posters were allegedly found at two of the 20 Bitcoin ATMs scattered across Winnipeg, so it seems the con isn’t that widespread. Local Police have said that no one has fallen victim to the latest scam, and I would bloody well hope not! Clearly the scammers are punting on Bitcoin ATM users not knowing the first thing about cryptocurrency. While cryptocurrency addresses are far from comprehensible, the mechanics of them are fairly simple. If you send Bitcoin to an address that you don’t own the private keys to, your coins are gone. Unless, perhaps you ask the person you sent them to, to return them. You’ll probably have to ask...