CEO

  • Optus says it is working to improve the experience of migrating to the NBN, with the telco’s CEO, Allen Lew, today revealing details of an initiative to smooth the transition to the new network. In notes prepared for an address to ACCANect, the conference of the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN), Lew revealed that the telco has invested “tens of millions of dollars” in the “Optus NBN champion” program. The program is designed to address a range of frustrations encountered by customers during the migration to the NBN. Those include confusion caused by the hand-off between sub-contractors, NBN Co and retail service providers (RSPs), struggles with installation and chasing answers to questions, lengthy activation processes, and a lack of visibility of the process for customers. “We are proactively reaching out to existing customers who are migrating to the NBN to reassure them that one person will manage their order from receipt right through to completion and for the first 30 days of activation,” Lew said. “This isn’t a promise to do; we have been embedding this since May and slowly building scale so that we can offer it to all our customers.” The CEO said that, over the last 18 months, Optus has made “significant changes” to its operations “to ensure the customer is at the centre of every decision we make”. That includes the launch of a “customer academy” for employees. “Our call centre agents now have more training and more authority, so they can solve issues without having to transfer calls so customers aren’t passed around,” Lew said. “We have added more agents, too. This means we have massively reduced our wait times. In fact, we just received new stats that our average wait time – which a year ago was a completely unacceptable – is now...
  • NBN Co seeking to grow its share of the enterprise networking market is a “little bit of a surprise” for Telstra, the telco’s CEO Andy Penn says. Addressing media during a briefing at the telco’s enterprise conference, Telstra Vantage, Penn said that it was particularly surprising because the rollout of the NBN was “slowing down” as it enters its final stages while NBN Co was simultaneously “diverting capital into building more fibre in CBDs”. “Effectively what it means at a practical level is capital is being diverted from rolling out the core purpose of the NBN to this, so that’s a surprise,” Penn said. “I had understood the purpose of the NBN was to provide broadband connectivity to every household in Australia not to build fibre for enterprise customers,” the CEO said, adding that “lots of telcos” already have fibre throughout CBDs. NBN Co has indicated it intends to eventually grow its revenue from businesses to $1 billion a year. Last month it revealed that its FY19 revenue from the business segment had grown 54 per cent year-on-year. “We are making great progress with the business segment contributing more than $388 million in revenue in FY19 and we expect this segment to remain solid and for residential and business customer demand for higher speed tiers to continue in FY20,” said NBN Co CEO Stephen Rue. In October 2018 NBN Co launched an Enterprise Ethernet offering. The service “was built in recognition of the fact that businesses, particularly large organisations, typically have higher levels of corporate data requirements due to large-scale distributed workforces, operating data-hungry applications and a higher incidence of mission-critical systems such as enterprise network systems and cloud-based solutions,” NBN Co’s corporate plan states. Another element of NBN Co’s business strategy is its Fibre Expansion Program, which extends existing...
  • LinkedIn has closed a loophole that allowed almost anyone to post a job listing on company pages without any authorization. Netherlands-based recruiter Michel Rijnders discovered the problem and posted his findings on the Microsoft-owned professional social network. The potentially serious flaw made it possible for users to post an unofficial job posting on nearly any company’s LinkedIn business page. These listings don’t just show up on the company’s “Jobs” page, but also on Google, which scrapes job listing information from different recruitment websites. LOL. Never thought of the fact that the LinkedIn loophole would also make my jobpost for CEO of Google appear on Google Jobs. https://t.co/q5j8c2Elte — Michel Rijnders (@rijnders) July 25, 2019 Usually, creating job postings requires a premium subscription, but Rijnders said he went on to create job postings for a Chief Executive Officer for Google and LinkedIn at no cost. “When I create a job post for a company, no questions are asked. You recommend to receive applications via LinkedIn, but I can also set up an external url to which applicants for your job are redirected,” Rijnders wrote. LinkedIn is looking for a Chief Executive Officer. pic.twitter.com/mLlTQnKWi7 — Michel Rijnders (@rijnders) July 25, 2019 Posting fraudulent jobs without a company’s knowledge is a violation of its terms and service. In addition to fooling a candidate into applying for positions that are non-existent, it can be abused by bad actors to redirect job seekers to an external website that can collect their sensitive information. After Rijnders made the post, LinkedIn’s head of trust and safety, Paul Rockwell, said in a comment that the company has removed the posting and that they’re working to resolve the issue that published his job listings. In a statement to Adweek, LinkedIn later said it has patched what appears to be a bug...