enterprise

  • NBN Co seeking to grow its share of the enterprise networking market is a “little bit of a surprise” for Telstra, the telco’s CEO Andy Penn says. Addressing media during a briefing at the telco’s enterprise conference, Telstra Vantage, Penn said that it was particularly surprising because the rollout of the NBN was “slowing down” as it enters its final stages while NBN Co was simultaneously “diverting capital into building more fibre in CBDs”. “Effectively what it means at a practical level is capital is being diverted from rolling out the core purpose of the NBN to this, so that’s a surprise,” Penn said. “I had understood the purpose of the NBN was to provide broadband connectivity to every household in Australia not to build fibre for enterprise customers,” the CEO said, adding that “lots of telcos” already have fibre throughout CBDs. NBN Co has indicated it intends to eventually grow its revenue from businesses to $1 billion a year. Last month it revealed that its FY19 revenue from the business segment had grown 54 per cent year-on-year. “We are making great progress with the business segment contributing more than $388 million in revenue in FY19 and we expect this segment to remain solid and for residential and business customer demand for higher speed tiers to continue in FY20,” said NBN Co CEO Stephen Rue. In October 2018 NBN Co launched an Enterprise Ethernet offering. The service “was built in recognition of the fact that businesses, particularly large organisations, typically have higher levels of corporate data requirements due to large-scale distributed workforces, operating data-hungry applications and a higher incidence of mission-critical systems such as enterprise network systems and cloud-based solutions,” NBN Co’s corporate plan states. Another element of NBN Co’s business strategy is its Fibre Expansion Program, which extends existing...
  • Every project, especially those for enterprise businesses, needs a clear hierarchy of task importance; this is easy in concept and hard in application. I can personally attest to the fact that prioritizing complex projects is much easier said than done, especially when it comes to managing employees. Since I do my best to hire top-shelf candidates, I can forget that even though I hired the right person for the job, he or she still needs a significant amount of coaching and training for success. After years of hiring employees, I’ve learned one golden rule … When it comes to prioritization, every hiring manager should move employee training to the top of the list of importance. Employee training improves productivity, increases retention and elevates job satisfaction rates. 1) Improve employee morale When employees are satisfied, they are less likely to look for different opportunities — both inside and outside of your enterprise. Ideally, all your employees will want to advance, but there’s only so much room to move up the ladder. To keep employees satisfied and contributing in their current roles, you need to help develop their professional skills and help them pursue their goals through employee training. When you invest in employees, they are more likely to have a positive attitude. Employees who receive training also show higher levels of engagement than employees who don’t receive training. Education helps workers feel excited about what they are learning and inspires them to apply their knowledge to their job; this offers a win-win for both the enterprise and the employees’ feelings of usefulness and success. 2) Tackle weaknesses My childhood math teacher would always tell me “not quite yet” when I got a solution wrong. Even when students were completely off track, he never told them that they were “lost” or “wrong.”...
  • A massive 90% of all blockchain platforms in businesses will have to be replaced before 2021, according to Gartner. The analyst company said blockchain platforms will have to be replaced to ensure they are competitive, secure and don’t become obsolete. Adrian Lee, senior research director at Gartner, said many CIOs created “unrealistic expectations” when assessing offerings from blockchain platform providers and service providers because they overestimated the capabilities and short-term benefits. “Blockchain platforms are emerging platforms and, at this point, nearly indistinguishable in some cases from core blockchain technology,” added Lee. Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric, IBM Blockchain, Multichain, Ripple, and R3 Corda are some of the blockchain platforms available commercially today. Lee said IT buyers in enterprises are being confused by the fragmented blockchain platform offerings which often overlap or are being used in a complementary fashion. “Compounding this challenge is the fact that blockchain platform vendors typically use messaging that does not link to a target buyer’s use cases and business benefits. For example, ‘transactions’ was the term mentioned the most in relation to blockchain, followed by ‘secure’ and ‘security’,” he said. “While these may be functions of blockchain-enabling technology, buyers are still confused as to how these functions are achieved or what benefits blockchain adds compared to their existing processes.” Interest in blockchain will continue to increase and the fragmented market is likely to continue for at least another five years, due to a lack of consensus and standards, before a single dominant blockchain platform might begin to emerge. Garter predicts that by 2025, the business value added by blockchain will be more than $176bn, but this will then surge to exceed $3.1tn by 2030, when more consensus and platform domination emerges. “Product managers should prepare for rapid evolution, early obsolescence, a shifting competitive landscape, future consolidation of offerings...
  • A massive 90% of all blockchain platforms in businesses will have to be replaced before 2021, according to Gartner. The analyst company said blockchain platforms will have to be replaced to ensure they are competitive, secure and don’t become obsolete. Adrian Lee, senior research director at Gartner, said many CIOs created “unrealistic expectations” when assessing offerings from blockchain platform providers and service providers because they overestimated the capabilities and short-term benefits. “Blockchain platforms are emerging platforms and, at this point, nearly indistinguishable in some cases from core blockchain technology,” added Lee. Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric, IBM Blockchain, Multichain, Ripple, and R3 Corda are some of the blockchain platforms available commercially today. Lee said IT buyers in enterprises are being confused by the fragmented blockchain platform offerings which often overlap or are being used in a complementary fashion. “Compounding this challenge is the fact that blockchain platform vendors typically use messaging that does not link to a target buyer’s use cases and business benefits. For example, ‘transactions’ was the term mentioned the most in relation to blockchain, followed by ‘secure’ and ‘security’,” he said. “While these may be functions of blockchain-enabling technology, buyers are still confused as to how these functions are achieved or what benefits blockchain adds compared to their existing processes.” Interest in blockchain will continue to increase and the fragmented market is likely to continue for at least another five years, due to a lack of consensus and standards, before a single dominant blockchain platform might begin to emerge. Garter predicts that by 2025, the business value added by blockchain will be more than $176bn, but this will then surge to exceed $3.1tn by 2030, when more consensus and platform domination emerges. “Product managers should prepare for rapid evolution, early obsolescence, a shifting competitive landscape, future consolidation of offerings...
  • At the start of the third week in May, Ken Charman, CEO of uFlexRewards, found himself in a meeting with the CFO of Unilever. The consumer packaged goods giant is not known as an enterprise IT software company, but in 2018 it created uFlexRewards, an enterprise software spin-out business. Clearly, uFlexRewards needs to deliver shareholder value. But on that day, this was not the reason for Charman’s conversation with the CFO, Graeme Pitkethly. According to Charman, Pitkethly was interested in how Unilever could embrace digital ideas. In 2016, it spent $1bn buying men’s grooming products startup Dollar Shave, which provides an online service selling shaving products to customers on demand. “Unilever acquired this online digital market for razors on demand, but we want to create new digital markets,” he says. Charman says Pitkethly asked about the situation where there is someone who is very creative, who leaves the company to create a startup and gets venture capital funding, based on knowledge from the parent company. “Graeme wants to be able to fund them, and be able to pay them a reward, in the same way as if they had left the company to set up a startup,” he says. “We need something that gives freedom and control, to break out of the rigid straitjacket of grades.” It is this idea of changing how a company thinks about grading and rewarding its staff that has been the journey Charman has been on at Unilever, leading to the uFlexRewards enterprise software business. So how did a 63-year-old retired IT businessman find himself heading up a Unilever spin-out business and speaking to the company’s CFO about entrepreneurship? Charman says: “I am 63, looking out over the fields, thinking I should be cutting hay. Why am I renting an apartment in London and running...