fix

  • If you cherish your jeans, you want to keep them wearable as long as possible. (Ricardo Gomez Angel via Unsplash/) There’s a particular sick stomach lurch that happens when you rip a favorite pair of jeans, not unlike the feeling of losing a beloved pet or fumbling a fragile family heirloom. For many of us, the denim we live in becomes an inextricable part of our lives. But a tear doesn’t have to mean tears. In recent years, a handful of pros have gained online acclaim by showing that it’s possible to re-weave denim, thereby healing a rip instead of just patching it. “Pretty much anything can be fixed,” says Kattya Torres, owner of New York City-based Denim Therapy. Torres’ company has become famous among jean lovers for seamlessly repairing even the most dramatic rips. “It’s like a puzzle. I have had jeans come in here that look, honestly, like a g-string, and we’re able to reconstruct it.” While you may not want to attempt that level of denim surgery right away, it’s possible to pull off some smaller patch jobs from the comfort of your own home. Jean therapy for beginners “Denim is extremely forgiving. It hides a lot of imperfection,” Torres says. That’s good news for those of us without access to the signature Colour Match system pioneered by Denim Therapy, or the specialized industrial sewing machines touted by companies like San Francisco-based Self Edge. But if you’re willing to tolerate some imperfection, you can do a passable job with some basic supplies and a standard sewing machine (or, if you don’t have a sewing machine, with a lot of patience). Ripped knees and crotch blowouts are the two most common types of repairs Torres sees, and both are within reach of the home re-weaver. “The most important...
  • All shades of pink, flowery patterns, dolls, and miniature kitchens — if you’re a woman, you’ll most likely have had all these and more imposed upon you since early childhood. The stereotypes about women, which in most cases come from men, can be harmful in many ways, influencing everything from career choices to health and wellness.  Speaking of the latter, as a woman and the founder of a healthtech company, I couldn’t help but notice that what wellness apps are offering today does not correspond with the actual needs of women. Most of the founders and top product people at healthtech companies can’t really “eat their own dog food,” that is, they are limited in their ability to use their own apps and uncover issues in user experience. The reason is that the vast majority of these people are male, while most of their users are female.  I can see a clear gender bias in app icons that come up when I search for “gym” (top) and “yoga” The issue has been brought up repeatedly over the past couple of years; however, it’s hard to give actionable advice on how to change things. That’s why I decided to write this post, to dig deeper into the issue and deliver several practical recommendations.  Stereotyping away More often than not, health apps marketed for women end up being incredibly tone-deaf when it comes to the features that are most important for a female audience. Take pregnancy as an example: most ovulation tracking apps assume that all female users want to get pregnant. Well, guess what — we often track our cycle to avoid pregnancy, or just to be aware of what’s going on with our body.  Cycle tracking itself is also far from perfect. It’s worth mentioning that it actually took Apple...
  • The labor shortage in America is forcing companies in every industry to reassess how they identify, attract, and keep top talent. A 2017 PwC survey of CEOs found that most viewed a lack of skilled workers as the primary threat to their business, and in 2019, hiring and retaining smart, capable people remains the chief internal concern of the entire executive suite, according to a global Conference Board survey. For many leaders in the tech industry, this concern has transformed into overwhelming anxiety as the talent gap continues to widen. When it comes to hiring in the modern business world, and particularly in the world of tech, speed wins. Yet the North American IT industry is home to some of the longest hiring cycles of any industry — 51 days on average. In cities where the talent shortage is especially acute, tech companies that can’t quickly identify and hire qualified candidates can’t compete. So why does the problem only seem to be getting worse? “Tech is risk-averse in its hiring practices, as evidenced by the industry’s adoption of both deeply technical and time-consuming skills testing, as well as soft-skill interviewing practices designed to find the ever-elusive ‘cultural fit,’” explains Jeff Mazur, executive director for LaunchCode, a nonprofit that provides programming training and matches individuals with companies. Time is not your friend The “hire slow, fire fast” mentality endemic in the sector has helped industry leaders maintain a stranglehold on top talent, and it works well in markets that already have a surplus of skilled workers. But for fast-growing companies or those located in areas without an established talent pipeline, subjecting qualified candidates to an arduous and lengthy interview process is a recipe for disaster. Those same candidates won’t wait around while you think about whether or not they’d be a...