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  • The Queensland Police Service says that there is a case for extending from 24 months to seven years the length that telcos need to retain ‘metadata’ to comply with Australia’s data retention regime. The data retention regime is currently subject to statutory review by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS). In a submission to the committee’s inquiry, QPS states that in its view the current dataset that telcos must retain to comply with the data retention regime is appropriate. That data (sometimes described by the government as ‘metadata’ or ‘historical telecommunications data’) covers a range of information about communications, but not the ‘contents’ of the communication (e.g. the words spoken during a call or the body of an email). It includes a range of subscriber and device details as well as the source, destination, timing and duration of a communication, and the location of equipment used for the communication. QPS said that a review of its 2017-18 activity revealed that in less than 6 per cent of the times that it sought access to metadata, the data involved was over 24 months old. On the vast majority of occasions the data sought was 0-3 months old, QPS said. However, “despite the relatively small number” of occasions where the data sought was more than 24 months old “they nevertheless form a vital part of some notable investigations in this State”. “Datasets extending beyond the 2-year period can often be pivotal in certain complex investigations especially where persons of interest have exercised their right to silence, where court proceedings are significantly protracted or the offence is not actually detected by police until a significant period later,” QPS said, citing the investigation of the murder of Daniel Morcombe as an example. The data retention regime does not restrict telcos from...
  • The data-stealing iPhone exploits detailed by Google last week may been used for state-sponsored campaigns targeting the Uyghur Muslim minority in China‘s autonomous region of Xinjiang. “The websites were part of a campaign to target the religious group by infecting an iPhone with malicious code simply by visiting a booby-trapped web page,” TechCrunch revealed, citing sources familiar with the matter. “In gaining unfettered access to the iPhone’s software, an attacker could read a victim’s messages, passwords, and track their location in near-real time,” the report said. What’s more, it appears the same websites also targeted Android and Microsoft Windows PCs in a similar campaign, according to Forbes. “The attacks were updated over time for different operating systems as the tech usage of the Uyghur community changed,” the source told Forbes. TechCrunch added that the websites also infected non-Uygurs who mistakenly accessed these websites because they showed up in Google search results. This apparently led the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to ask the company to de-index the sites and reduce the number of infections. The search giant’s Project Zero security team disclosed a group of malicious websites that were used as a watering hole to attract and infect iPhone users by penetrating iOS‘s digital protections. The unpatched zero-days were exploited by hackers to install spyware that stole photos, chat messages, emails, and log-in credentials from iPhones and iPads. The websites had “thousands of visitors” per week for at least since 2017, Google said. The exploit chains affected iOS versions spanning from iOS 10.0.1 released in September 2016 to 12.1.2 issued last December. Apple fixed the vulnerabilities in iOS 12.1.4 in February, within a week after Google privately notified the iPhone maker of the flaws. But the deep-dive analysis by Project Zero researcher Ian Beer stopped short of revealing the...
  • The tiny Polish village of Miejsce Odrzanskie has become the unlikely source of international media attention over the past fortnight as a result of what the New York Times called “a strange population anomaly”. It has now been almost a decade since the last boy was born in this place, with the most recent 12 babies all having been girls. The mayor of the region is quoted in the article as saying there has been “scientific interest” – presumably from geneticists – in exploring what has led to this unusual sequence. He also discusses some glaringly unscientific advice the town has been given on how to conceive boys, ranging from changing mothers’ diets to “keeping an ax(e) under your marital bed”. But the most prosaic suggestion mentioned in the article is also by far the most likely – that it’s just a statistical coincidence. So how could this be possible? Just like a coin toss, a birth has two equally likely outcomes – and therefore the probability of any given baby being a girl is ½. We can also assume that each individual birth can be considered to be independent of the previous one – the first mother having a girl doesn’t make it any more or less likely that the second mother will have a girl. Therefore, the probability of having two girls in a row is ½ x ½ = (½)2 = ¼. By extension, we can see that the probability of 12 consecutive girls being born in Miejsce Odrzanskie is (½)12 = 1/4096. In isolation, that sounds extremely unlikely – if you were told there was a one in 4,000 chance of it raining tomorrow then you probably wouldn’t bother with your umbrella. However, it’s important to remember that these odds relate to the very specific question:...
  • Researchers from Google have uncovered what appears to be a concentrated malware campaign targeting iPhones for at least two years. Thankfully this may be over now, although they warn it’s possible there are others that are yet to be seen. Project Zero, the search giant’s security team tasked with finding zero-day vulnerabilities in software, said they discovered a small collection of malicious websites that could be used to hack the devices, using previously undisclosed five different exploit chains. The chains leveraged 14 different vulnerabilies that covered every version from iOS 10 all the way through iOS 12. Apple issued a patch in its iOS 12.1.4 update back in February after the team privately disclosed the flaws, and gave the iPhone maker just a week to fix them. Project Zero normally adheres to a strict 90-day disclosure period, but the reduced deadline is indicative of the seriousness of the vulnerabilities involved. Credit: Project ZeroThe five exploit chains leverage all iOS versions from iOS 10 to iOS 12. “There was no target discrimination; simply visiting the hacked site was enough for the exploit server to attack your device, and if it was successful, install a monitoring implant. We estimate that these sites receive thousands of visitors per week,” Project Zero researcher Ian Beer. The exploits — called watering hole attacks — allow a bad actor to compromise a specific group of end users by infecting websites that they are known to visit, with an intention to gain access to the victim’s device to infect it with malware or malvertisements. The 14 vulnerabilities span across Safari and the kernel (aka the core operating system), aside from two separate instances of sandbox escapes, wherein arbitrary code can be executed outside of an application’s confines. In short, the five attack chains granted elevated “root” access to an attacker, giving...
  • Another Google service bites the dust, and this time it’s Google Hire. The company said it’ll shut down the job tracking system by next year. Hire helped HR departments keep track of and communicate with candidates. This tool was a product in development at Bebop, a startup Google acquired for $380 million in 2015. Its founder and CEO, Diane Greene, helped Google build this product. She later joined the Alphabet board in early this year, and left the seat in June. The company said in an email to customers that it’ll focus its resources in other products in the Google Cloud portfolio: While Hire has been successful, we’re focusing our resources on other products in the Google Cloud portfolio. We are deeply grateful to our customers, as well as the champions and advocates who have joined and supported us along the way. Well poo. I really liked Google Hire. #RipGoogleHire pic.twitter.com/7P3JtYPRq3 — Ⓐ®️Ⓛ⓪ (@arlogilbert) August 27, 2019 As TechCrunch noted Google won’t take any charges for Google Hire’s services after the next billing cycle for the existant customers. Guess it’s time to update the Google Cemetary. 10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something anonymously on Internet. 10 minute mail
  • Today, OnePlus inaugurated its first Research & Development center in India. The center, located in the southern city of Hyderabad, will initially focus on software features and cover areas such as AI, 5G, and IoT along the way. The company said this is its biggest R&D facility yet, and it plans to host over 1,500 employees there within a couple of years. The company’s general manager for India, Vikas Agarwal said the team will aim to work on features – for India and other global markets – of OnePlus’ OxygenOS. Along with this, the Chinese manufacturer will set up three labs in the new office: a camera experience improvement lab, an automation lab to test aging of a device, and a network research lab that’ll support the company’s ongoing 5G development. The company’s product manager for India, Szymon Kopec, said the camera team in Hyderbad will work in tandem with the team in Taiwan’s camera lab, to improve image quality for Indian users. OnePlus is following steps of fellow Chinese company Oppo, which also opened a research facility in Hyderabad last year. The company said it’ll invest over Rs 1,000 crore ($138 million) in coming years into this center, proving that India has always been an important country for OnePlus’ strategy. Just like the fellow Chinese phone company Oppo, OnePlus is making a smart bet to harness the abundance of software talent in India, to make itself more prominent in the country — and the world. For more gear, gadget, and hardware news and reviews, follow Plugged onTwitter andFlipboard. Published August 26, 2019 — 09:04 UTC 10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a...
  • A new study shows confirms the worst fears of mobile phone manufacturers like Apple and Samsung. According to responses from 3,640 mobile phone users shows that more than half of them plan to keep their current device for three to five more years. In recent years, we’ve certainly seen the slowdown. People who once rushed to buy the latest and greatest iPhone (like me) are now patiently bypassing new offerings and instead waiting an additional year (or more) between upgrades. For me, my current iPhone X has been wonderful, to the point where I saw little need to upgrade during last year’s announcement. For others, they’re still holding on to the iPhone 7, or even the 6. “After so many years of people being pressured into upgrading to a new phone when their old phone was perfectly functional, it’s encouraging to see that so many of our survey respondents are hanging on to their devices for longer,” said Andrew Moore-Crispin, Director of Content at Ting Mobile. “The data from our survey indicates that people are more conscious about things like price and basic phone functionality. They don’t care so much about having the latest, coolest tech — something that might not be great news for the big manufacturers this year.” And while the two-year upgrade cycle has been the standard for at least the past few years, all signs point to that growing even longer. 55 percent of respondents, for example, said they plan to keep their current phone for three to five years. 47 percent had kept their previous phone for more than three years. Of those surveyed, only 15 percent, in fact, upgraded their last phone before the two year mark. This can’t be good news for Tim Apple… I mean… Cook. 10 minutes mail – Also known...
  • Source of a different color. (illustration by Marcela Restrepo/) Most of the hues we look at these days come courtesy of 16,777,216 alphanumeric keys called Hex codes; tinting your technicolor digital life is as simple as copying a string of characters. But the shades on this page—and all your off-screen belongings—come from resources we must conscript to create our chosen chroma. Affixing color to an object (and making it stick) is tricky business. For most of human history, we’ve derived dyes from nature: People cooked plants and animals until they produced the desired pigment, or mined precious minerals from subterranean seams and ground them into paints. But even once we took to the lab to concoct new colors, some shades remained rarefied. This chart shows a few of the commodities that tint our kaleidoscopic world—and how long it took their popularity to fade. 1. Tyrian purple Phoenician and Roman emperors loved that this wine-colored dye didn’t fade. But making just an ounce meant milking or crushing 250,000 Murex sea snails, which use their tinted mucus to protect eggs and sedate prey. 2. Ultramarine For more than a thousand years, a single region in Afghanistan was the only source of lapis lazuli, the blue rock we refine into ultra­marine. Scarcity and a supposed resistance to fading made it as valuable as gold for millennia. 3. Imperial yellow Only the Chinese emperor and his representatives were allowed this spiritually significant shade. With a simple wood-ash ­mordant—​an oxide that affixes dyes to ­materials—​the golden foxglove-​plant extract easily sticks to silk. 4. Mummy “Dead man’s head” was one part oil, one part amber resin, and too ​­many ​­parts Homo sapiens. It got its brown tint from the flesh, bones, and bandages of well-preserved Egyptian corpses. Fittingly, artists used it for skin tones. 5. Scheele’s green...
  • Geologists have dubbed Earth’s middle age the “boring billion”. Occurring some 1,800 to 800 million years ago, it has long been considered a period when little happened on Earth in terms of biological evolution, climate, or the chemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. But emerging evidence now suggests that the “boring billion” may have been far more dynamic than that. Our planet has been shaped by many monumental events. From the Cambrian explosion around 540 million years ago, when most animal forms appeared, to the rise and fall of the dinosaurs, the dramatic course of biological evolution is well documented by the fossil record. Similarly, from the glaciations of the most recent ice age, to much earlier “snowball Earth” periods, when the entire planet may have frozen over for millions of years, climate change has left a clear imprint on the geological record. But then we come to the “boring billion”, where the rocks appear to give us startling evidence for, well, not much really. Geologic clock: if Earth’s history is plotted over 12hrs, not much happened between about 7 and 10 o’clock. Woudloper / wiki, CC BY-SA At first glance, the Earth seems to have been stuck in perpetual stasis across this billion year interval. The planet was likely somewhat warmer than today, but there is zero evidence in the rocks for any dramatic change in climate. Oxygen in the atmosphere was stuck at a level much lower than we have today, and indeed much of the global ocean was entirely devoid of oxygen, leading to inhospitable seas that were rich in either iron or toxic hydrogen sulphide (the smelly gas released by rotten eggs). While the first eukaryotes (cells with a nucleus) had already evolved, the pace of biological evolution appeared to have stalled. Until recently, the most...
  • Earlier this year we told you about the Roller Coaster Tycoon fan who built the world’s most masochistic theme park ride. The coaster, called “Wild Mouse,” was a near-endless loop that circled a virtual theme park some 600 times, a 12-year ride. Marcel Vos, the creator of the coaster from hell just one-upped himself, building a ride he’s appropriately calling “45 Years in Hell.” As you may have guessed from the name, Vos has now created a coaster nearly four times as long as his original — which he assumed was the longest ride possible within the game. This one would take 45 years to complete, if riding in real time. That’s a helluva long ride, and a boring one to boot. The coaster is so boring, in fact, that it actually travels in reverse for a period of time just to make sure that you have to relive the hell that is riding it over and over again. It’s the longest roller coaster ever created in Roller Coaster Tycoon 2. And let’s hope it stays that way. You can check the video out below. 10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something anonymously on Internet. 10 minute mail